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The top 3 dental emergencies and how to handle them

The top 3 dental emergencies and how to handle them

Many people know first aid basics and what to do in medical emergencies. But handling dental emergencies is not always common knowledge. Your first experiences with dental emergencies may be when they happen to you or a loved one. Here are the top 3 dental emergencies and how to handle them.

Knocked-out tooth

When a tooth gets knocked out, you need to see a dentist as soon as possible. The tooth has the best chance of being saved if it’s returned to its socket and seen by a dentist within one hour.

Before seeing your dentist, pick up the tooth by the crown, which is the part that’s exposed when in the mouth. Rinse it with water if dirty. Do not remove any tissue fragments or scrub it. Try to put it back in its place inside the mouth if possible. Don’t force it if there is a lot of bleeding or swelling.

If you can’t put the tooth back in the socket, put it in a small container of milk. If you don’t have milk, use a cup of water with a pinch of salt. Another alternative if there is no other choice is to hold it in the mouth next to the cheek making sure it doesn’t get swallowed. It just mustn’t dry out.

Lost crown

Call your dentist for an appointment and bring your crown with you. If you can’t see the dentist right away and the exposed tooth is painful, dip a cotton bud in clove oil and apply it to the tooth. Clove oil is available at your chemist’s shop or in the spice aisle of your grocery store.

Abscess

An abscess is an infection that can lead to serious health consequences, so it’s important to see your dentist right away. It usually looks like a swollen pimple or swelling of the surrounding tissue and can be painful. The infection is usually around the tooth root or space between the teeth and gums. Not only can it cause tissue damage, but the infection can spread to other parts of the body if left untreated. Until you can see a dentist, rinse your mouth several times a day with a mild warm salt water solution to ease any pain and draw out the pus. Pain relief may also be required.

If you are currently experiencing a dental emergency, please contact our reception staff and explain your circumstances. We will usually be able to see you the same day.

The top 3 dental emergencies and how to handle them

The top 3 dental emergencies and how to handle them

Many people know first aid basics and what to do in medical emergencies. But handling dental emergencies is not always common knowledge. Your first experiences with dental emergencies may be when they happen to you or a loved one. Here are the top 3 dental emergencies and how to handle them.

Knocked-out tooth

When a tooth gets knocked out, you need to see a dentist as soon as possible. The tooth has the best chance of being saved if it’s returned to its socket and seen by a dentist within one hour.

Before seeing your dentist, pick up the tooth by the crown, which is the part that’s exposed when in the mouth. Rinse it with water if dirty. Do not remove any tissue fragments or scrub it. Try to put it back in its place inside the mouth if possible. Don’t force it if there is a lot of bleeding or swelling.

If you can’t put the tooth back in the socket, put it in a small container of milk. If you don’t have milk, use a cup of water with a pinch of salt. Another alternative if there is no other choice is to hold it in the mouth next to the cheek making sure it doesn’t get swallowed. It just mustn’t dry out.

Lost crown

Call your dentist for an appointment and bring your crown with you. If you can’t see the dentist right away and the exposed tooth is painful, dip a cotton bud in clove oil and apply it to the tooth. Clove oil is available at your chemist’s shop or in the spice aisle of your grocery store.

Abscess

An abscess is an infection that can lead to serious health consequences, so it’s important to see your dentist right away. It usually looks like a swollen pimple or swelling of the surrounding tissue and can be painful. The infection is usually around the tooth root or space between the teeth and gums. Not only can it cause tissue damage, but the infection can spread to other parts of the body if left untreated. Until you can see a dentist, rinse your mouth several times a day with a mild warm salt water solution to ease any pain and draw out the pus. Pain relief may also be required.

If you are currently experiencing a dental emergency, please contact our reception staff and explain your circumstances. We will usually be able to see you the same day.

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